12 English words that are easy to get confused

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A person learning English is very easy to confuse. Literally everything is in the head: the difference between the consumption of tenses, between suggest and offer ; say, tell and speak , etc. It’s also good when words similar in meaning are spelled differently - this helps to find at least one difference. But what if the meaning, spelling, and pronunciation are very similar? That's when you want to put your fingers in the socket) However, we suggest you save electricity and once and for all deal with the words that beginners most often confuse in English.

1. ACCEPT / EXCEPT

Accept is a verb meaning "accept, accept".

Except (for) is the preposition "except".

  • We have accepted your invitation to the conference.
  • Everything is ready except for the invitations.

2. AFFECT / EFFECT

Affect - "to influence, cause changes."

Effect - "lead to some result."

  • Her report further affected policy of the company.
  • She starved for 4 days which affected a weight loss.
  • Both of these words can be both verbs and nouns.

3. ALL TOGETHER/ALTOGETHER

All together - "everything".

Altogether is an adverb meaning "totally, in general, total."

  • This group of students participated in the discussion all together.
  • Altogether the cost comes to 20 dollars.

4. AWARD / REWARD

Award - "award, especially note, give a prize."

Reward - "reward, compensate."

  • This actor was awarded for his performance.
  • He was rewarded for his assistance in searching for the missing kids.
  • Both of these words can be both verbs and nouns.

5. COMPLEMENT / COMPLIMENT

Compliment - "compliment, praise."

Complement - "addition".

  • John paid a compliment to his wife.
  • This sauce is a perfect complement to fish dishes.

6. CONSUL/COUNSEL/COUNCIL

Consul - "consul, official representative of the government in a foreign country."

Counsel - "adviser, legal consultant."

Council - "council, legal body."

  • The consul is expected to arrive at 2pm
  • You may see the counsel to get a legal advice.
  • The council for child policy was founded in 2002.

7. LATER / LATTER

Later is an adverb meaning "later".

Latter is an adjective meaning "recent".

  • I'll call him back later.
  • The latter change in anti-tobacco policy has caused controversy.

8. NOTABLE / NOTICEABLE

Notable - "outstanding, famous."

Noticeable - "noticeable, conspicuous."

  • His notable contribution is still a point of discussion today.
  • Unfortunately, her new haircut was hardly noticeable to her colleagues.

9. PRINCIPAL / PRINCIPLE

Principal - "1. School director 2. Actor of the first plan.

principle - "principle".

  • The principal distributed bonuses among his deputies.
  • The key principle of their success is teamwork.

10. PRECEDE/PROCEED

Precede - "to precede."

Proceed - "to continue."

  • An overall quiz preceded the final exam.
  • Could you please proceed with the next issue?

11. QUIET / QUIT / QUITE

Quiet is the adjective "quiet, calm".

Quit is the verb "stop, stop, finish."

Quite is the adverb "enough, enough, quite".

  • Could you be more quiet? The kids are sleeping!
  • She quit smoking at 34.
  • I find this book quite interesting.

12 STATIONARY / STATIONERY

Stationary is the adjective "stationary, motionless."

Stationery is the noun for stationery.

  • This stationary equipment was purchased a year ago.
  • Have you placed an order for stationery yet?